Home/Tag:wiping

The Aesthetics of the Edge

I have always been fairly particular about the edges of the plate in my etchings.  When the image got to the point where it didn't need to go back in the etch again, I would pull out a file and clean the edges up.  First, long strokes perpendicular  to the face to make everything nice and straight.  Then cutting a [...]

Artistic wiping

I was wiping a trial proof of a deeply etched plate the other day and got to thinking about the art of wiping. Much of the process of wiping is mechanical, so my mind often has time to wander. In this particular case, I was contemplating the difference between an 'artistic' wipe and a clean one.Historically some printmakers (Whistler comes [...]

The Dynamics of Wiping

I was working on printing an edition yesterday and I had plenty of time to think about how the ink, plate and tarlatan (or your hand) interact during the process.When you first start to wipe after applying the ink (I use a silicon spatula for that) you are mostly using physical means to remove the ink. I like to think [...]

Carborundum Print

A couple of months ago, I wrote about some experimentation I had done with collagraphic media. Subsequently, I used the technique in a print that I have not editioned yet, and I am just finishing the editioning of a new work executed completely as a carborundum print. The process is relatively straight forward. I used Golden Heavy Acrylic Gel Medium [...]

More on wiping intaglio

Back in January I talked a bit about hand wiping intaglio plates. I have continued to use this approach and, like most things you practice, have gotten better at it. I was pulling a proof of a new engraving on acrylic in the studio today. The first photo shows the plate after it was wiped with the tarlatan. The objective [...]

Wiping Intaglio

I have recently begun to hand wipe my intaglio plates.For those not familiar with the intaglio processes, in an intaglio print, the image areas are recessed below the surface of the plate. This can be done with acid (or electricity, more on that another time) for an etching or aquatint, by scratching mechanically (drypoint), or by carving yielding an engraving [...]